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Over to You M’Lords to vote on Mambo No 5!

Yvette Cooper and Oliver Letwin had the MPs pull a night shift yesterday to rush through a bill to slow down Brexit, trying to prevent a clean Brexit.

They just got the legislation through the House of Commons by 1 vote… and it’s on to the House of Lords to ensure the people’s will is done in a timely fashion.

What’s interesting is that both MPs, representatives of the main parties, are both part of the “Friends of Israel” organisation which, as far as I can tell, means that they want what’s best for Israel over that of their constituents.

Challenge their membership and you’ll be branded “anti-semitic”, a hater of jews… which is obviously a load of tosh, you simply feel they should be focused on the interests of your constituents first… 69.3% of Yvette Coopers constituents voted to leave the EU, with Oliver’s matching the national vote.

Why do these people believe they have the power to go against what their constituents voted for… does the ego really think it was them as glowing individuals that their constituents voted for or was it the national party flag they were flying that caught the voters eye.

Personally, I’d be happy for the nation to hold another referendum as we know so much more about the whole political machine than we did back in 2016. We know that the EU wants to beat us with sticks for daring to want to leave. We know that at least 50% of national party candidates cannot be trusted to do as the population wishes.

Which makes me conclude, if we did hold a referendum with these two choices:
A – Brexit with a deal negotiated by a cross party of MPs at some date in the future, maybe!
B – Just Brexit, leave tomorrow and work out terms from there

That the majority of people would opt for B… am I wrong?

Well let’s hope the Lords come back and block the their bill, let’s see what today might bring…

Bill 37157/1 European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill

1 A BILL TO Make provision in connection with the period for negotiations for withdrawing from the European Union.

EIT ENACTED by the Queen’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1 Duties in connection with Article 50 extension

(1)On the day after the day on which this Act receives Royal Assent, the Prime Minister must move a motion in the House of Commons in the form set out in subsection (2).

(2)The form of the motion set out in this subsection is –“That this House agrees for the purposes of section 2 of the European Union(Withdrawal) Act 2019 to the Prime Minister seeking an extension of the period specified in Article 50(3) of the Treaty on European Union to a period ending on […]”

(3)A motion in the form set out in subsection (2) must include a date in the position indicated by the brackets in that subsection.

(4)If the motion in the form set out in subsection (2) for the purposes of subsection(1) is agreed to without amendment, the Prime Minister must seek an extension of the period specified in Article 50(3) of the Treaty on European Union to a period ending on the date included in that motion.
(5)If the motion in the form set out in subsection (2) for the purposes of subsection(1) is agreed to with an amendment to change the date in the motion as moved to another date, the Prime Minister must seek an extension of the period specified in Article 50(3) of the Treaty on European Union for a period endingon the date included in the motion as agreed to.

(6)Subsection (7) applies if the European Council proposes an extension of the period specified in Article 50(3) of the Treaty on European Union to a period ending other than on the date proposed in the resolution arising from the motion in the form set out in subsection (2) for the purposes of subsection (1).

(7)If the condition in subsection (6) is met, on the day after the European Councilmakes the proposal referred to in subsection (6), the Prime Minister must movea motion in the House of Commons in the form set out in subsection (2).

2 Interpretation, commencement, extent and short title

(1)Any term used in this Act which is also defined in section 20 of the 2018 Acthas the same meaning in this Act as in that Act.

(2)This Act comes into force on the day on which this Act is passed.(3)This Act extends to England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.(4)This Act may be cited as the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019.

Presented by Yvette Cooper supported bySir Oliver Letwin, Hilary Benn,Dame Caroline Spelman, Jack Dromey, Alison McGovern, Mr Dominic Grieve, Clive Efford, Stephen Doughty,Norman Lamb, Ben Lakeand Stewart Hosie.

 

Photo by Michael D Beckwith on Unsplash

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